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"Horror d'Oeuvres: Bite-Sized Tales of Terror" for Scares That Care

The world of horror isn't all blood, guts, and gore!

Well, okay, it is. But sometimes the gross stuff is for a good cause. Check out Horror d'Oeuvres: Bite-Sized Tales of Terror, a horror novel including twenty-seven authors and edited by the narrator of Dead Oaks short stories "Skookum Lake" and "I Rarely Get Visitors," Rafael Marmol. Proceeds from Horror d'Oeuvres benefit Scares That Care, a charity associated with the horror community.

To find out more about Horror d'Oeuvres and Scares That Care, read on...

Be warned.

Horror d’Oeuvres: Bite-Sized Tales of Terror is an exquisite array of easily digestible horror micro-fiction from today’s freshest authors. Each tale is a demonic symphony that will peel away the layers of your mind and reduce your soul to a simmering nightmare within seven hundred words or less. 

These stories are not for the faint of heart or weak of constitution. Offering an abundant variety of deliciously dark and twisted treats, readers can expect to encounter depraved deities, unsettling realities, and creature features. Like the satisfaction of a good meal or the threat of impending doom, they’ll stick with you long after you’ve tucked the book away. 

All proceeds of Horror d’Oeuvres will be donated to Scares That Care, a non-profit charity fighting the real monsters of childhood illness, severe burns, and breast cancer by helping ease the financial burden on families facing these extraordinary hardships.


To purchase a copy of Horror d'Oeuvres and help Scares That Care, visit Amazon. To learn more about Scares That Care, visit www.scaresthatcare.org.





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