Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from 2016

It's Coming.

Reliving the Nightmare: A Definitive Ranking of the Elm Street Films

Happy Halloween(ish), podcast fans! With Dead Oaks: A Horror Anthology Podcast wrapping up its first season a couple of weeks ago, the plan is to fill the gap between season one and two (now to January) with some awesome, spooky content. First up is a definitive ranking of every film in one of the most well known horror movie franchises in existence, A Nightmare on Elm Street.

For the past few weeks, I've been watching (and live-tweeting) all of the nine Elm Street movies, trying to separate the best of the best from the cringe-worthy--but not in a good way--entries in the series. Keep scrolling for Dead Oaks's ranking, starting with the worst...

9 & 8. The Dream Child (1989) and Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare (1991)



It makes sense that two newest films in the original Elm Street cannon (New Nightmare doesn't really count, and we'll get to that later...) are the two worst. By the time The Dream Child and Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare rolled around, …

From the Ashes of Pompeii and Other Dark Tales [Promotion]

By Manen Lyset Go on a hair-raising journey from the scorching ashes of Pompeii, to a mysterious lakebed, and through a disturbing maze-like bunker. Will the story of a girl freed from her chains lift your spirit? Would you believe that good luck has its downsides? Encounter horrors hiding in plain sight within this collection of twelve tales of terror designed to shock and frighten you. You might discover fears you never knew you had. From the Ashes of Pompeii is available on Amazon in both paperback and Kindle format.



Dead Oaks: "The End of Everything"

Otto is out of time. Worlds hang in the balance. This. is the end of everything.

We hope you enjoyed your stay in Dead Oaks. Today’s episode, “The End of Everything,” was written by Christopher Waltz.
The voice of Otto Gillespie was Aaron Beck and the voice of Dr. Nate was special guest star Ryan Moore. Music in today’s episode was “Creepy,” written and performed by Nicholas Critney.
Check back in two weeks for the final short story installment of Dead Oaks, “Me and Jasper Down by the Meth Shack,” by Aaron Saylor. For more information, find us on Twitter, @deadoakspodcast or visit www.deadoakspodcast.com.

October: The Most Horror-Able Month

October, the most horror-able month, is (nearly) upon us. And here's your chance to promote what you think is the most worthy horror you've ever witnessed. The premise is simple: sign up for a date using the form below, do a quick write-up of the horror you choose to promote, and see it broadcast on deadoakspodcast.com during the month of October.
The horror you promote is up to you, meaning whatever you think is worthy--as long as you can explain why--is perfectly acceptable. If you choose to promote something you've created, be sure to include links, images, videos, and anything else to spread the word!
You may choose more than one date, but please be considerate of others signing up, and try not to pick dates that fall in the same week.

Once you've got what you'd like to promote put together, send the information in an email to deadoakssubmission@gmail.com.
Happy October, and thanks for participating in the most horror-able month of the year!

Loading...

Dead Oaks: "Into the Woods"

Today’s episode, “Into the Woods,” was written by Christopher Waltz. The voice of Otto Gillespie was Aaron Beck, and the voice of The Librarian was Christopher Waltz.
Music in today’s episode was “Creepy,” written and performed by Nicholas Critney. And “Entombed,” courtesy of purple-planet.com.
Check back in two weeks for the final short story installment of Dead Oaks, “Me and Jasper Down by the Meth Shack,” by Aaron Saylor. And don't miss the season finale to Otto's Story, "The End of Everything," coming on September 18th. For more information, find us on Twitter, @deadoakspodcast or visit www.deadoakspodcast.com.

Dead Oaks: "An Insatiable Appetite" by Sean Hodell

By Sean Hodell
The baby snake slithers willingly into your belly, scorching your esophagus on the way down. There is an immediate onset of nausea as it wades through your stomach acid. You press your lips together to prevent yourself from retching. Sunlight peeks through the blinds in your bedroom. The smell of bacon wafts through the door, which only adds to the nausea. You’re hungry, starving actually, but not for that. You have an appetite for something, but you find yourself drawing a blank on what it actually is that the snakelet wants. You found its mother coiled around a branch protruding from a fallen tree in the lake the previous evening. You had your bow with you, so you shot it. Right in the belly. Sure, you could have shot it the head, but you were in a torturous mood. Naturally, the snake was pissed at first. It tried striking you several times, but the arrow went all the way through, leaving it with a debilitating pain. When you ripped the arrow out, the underside of the rep…

Dead Oaks: "Messages, Part 2"

After having been locked in an asylum and attacking his doctor, Otto is on the run--yet again--from the malevolent forces of Dead Oaks, and those closest to him (both good and evil) are out to find him. While the end of Otto's story draws closer, a series of voicemail messages reveals even more about the sinister town of Dead Oaks and how Otto may or may not be able to escape his own fate.

Today’s episode, “Messages Part Two” was written by Christopher Waltz. The voice of Lenore Fischer was Cherie Sanders. The voice of Mrs. Gillespie was Debby Fey. The voice of the Librarian was Christopher Waltz. And the voice of Dr. Nate was special guest star Ryan Moore. Music in today’s episode was "Creepy," performed and recorded by Nicholas Critney and "Diabolus," courtesy of purple-planet.com. Check back in two weeks for the next short story installment of Dead Oaks, Insatiable Appetite by Sean Hodell. And for more information, check out www.deadoakspodcast.com or find us o…

Dead Oaks: Three Tales

Today’s episode of Dead Oaks: A Horror Anthology Podcast, “Three Tales” was narrated by Edward Whalen. “Gnaw” was written by Chris Lovato. “Sounds” was written by Ibrahim Oga. And “Leonard” was written by Tonissa Saul.
Music in today’s episode was “Creepy” performed and recorded by Nicholas Critney along with “Faded Grandeur,” “Harbinger of Doom,” and “Turning the Screw,” courtesy of purple-planet.com.
Please check back in two weeks for the next episode in Otto’s Story, “Message, Part 2.” Dead Oaks is brought to you by BronzeCast Productions. For more information about the authors and stories you heard today, and for more information, find us on Twitter @deadoakspodcast.

To read each individual story and find out more about the authors, keep scrolling!

Gnaw by Chris Lovato
Chalk glided across a blackboard to make a list.
“Now, who can tell me what these are?” Miss Rachel Griffiths turned to her class, pointing to what she'd written. Many hands raised, and she pointed to one.
“Colors!” The…

Dead Oaks: "Dr. Nate"

In the latest episode of Otto's story, Otto sits down for a psychiatric session with Dr. Nate, who may have ulterior motives when it comes to helping Otto discover who he really is and why he continues losing time through blackouts. “Dr. Nate” was written by me, Christopher Waltz. The voice of Dr. Nate was special guest star Ryan Moore, and the voice of Otto Gillespie was Aaron Beck. Music in today’s episode was “Creepy” performed and recorded by Nicholas Critney. Please check back in two weeks for a special short story installment of Dead Oaks featuring three short tales written by three different authors. Dead Oaks is brought to you by BronzeCast Productions. For more information and instructions on submitting your own Dead Oaks story, check out www.deadoakspodcast.com or find us on Twitter @deadoakspodcast.

Horror Update: The Log House by Baylea Hart

A woman abandoned in a deadly forest is forced to fight for her survival...
Penny does not care about other people. They are necessary only in as far as they are useful, and most are not useful at all. 
Getting pregnant, the unplanned side-effect of her affair with a married man, was useful. Having a child meant that she could live in relative peace, safe from the dangers outside a house shared by hundreds. A house that includes the man’s wife, Mary, a woman who watches Penny from the shadows.
When Penny wakes on a makeshift boat careening down a river, head throbbing, she knows Mary is responsible. Left to the deadly forest that surrounds their home, Penny is forced to navigate her way back to her child, and to Mary, hell-bent on revenge.
But Penny is not alone in the forest. Between the thick trees, inky eyes follow her as she moves. Their smiles growing.
Penny is being hunted, and the only thing that keeps her going is the fiery hatred for Mary, burning in her gut. Until she meets Mia. …